About Kate

http://www.katescreativespace.com

I blog at www.katescreativespace.com

Posts by Kate :

Moody blues

Storm blue walls with woodplank wallpaper

Recently I’ve become obsessed with deep, inky blues and charcoals, and decided to give our bedroom a bit of a makeover.  Regular readers will remember it’s a big, high-ceilinged room, connected to a bathroom which floods with morning light;

bathroom in muted shades

A couple of years ago I papered the chimney breast in woodplank wallpaper, and have done very little to it since.

Woodplank wallpaper walls

…until now!

Ink blue accent wall

I handmixed three paint shades together until I got the colour I wanted; a deep, inky-blue that changes with the light, becoming velvety and absorbing as dusk falls, but clean and striking in daylight hours.  I used it on a single wall, facing tall picture windows that suffuse the room with light.

Ink blue bedroom walls

It provides a  contrast to the fireplace and the vintage French windows we’ve finally hung on the wall…

vintage mirrored windows

Ink blue bedroom accents

And meet my other new ‘makeover’ investment; this beautiful Seco Octo curved wood light, which is mesmerising when lit.  We first saw one in a store in Paris and I quietly obsessed about it for a year before buying one!

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We love the change; subtle and strong; deep and enveloping.  An evening colour, for relaxing and cocooning.

p.s. It’s just as well I like the colour, because I am still washing flecks of it from my hair, my forearms, my shoes…

Have a wonderful weekend!

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DIY Printed Paper Sacks (to hold practically anything…)

Print-at-home paper potato sacks!

Harry, during a mere 7yrs on this planet, has accumulated approximately 9,847 soft animals.

Well, maybe somewhat less than that, though it certainly feels like a lot when you are saying goodnight to them each in turn.  I feel a little like Maria must have done in the Sound of Music when trying to recall all the names of the von Trapp children, though at least hers only ran to single digits.

Still, I am in part to blame; most of the animals came from me, either directly or via my alter ego of Father Christmas.  Now though, they need a home.  Harry’s favourites still warrant a VIP place under the duvet each night, but what the others need is storage.

DIY Paper Sacks

 

I discovered that for a mere £5 you can buy online a handful of giant paper sacks designed to hold 25kg of potatoes.  I am not likely to ever successfully grow 25kg of any vegetable, so instead ordered some to use for stuffed animals, laundry and the myriad of art materials filling every surface of the art room.  And then I decided to see if you can use t-shirt transfers to print on them – and you can!  Instructions below…

Materials:

  • Large paper sacks like these or these; iron them on a low heat if necessary to ensure a flat surface
  • T-shirt transfer paper; I use Epson Cool Peel for most projects, including this one (not the cheapest, but really good results)

Step-by-Step

  1. Design your label and then print it onto the transfer paper, being careful to select ‘mirror image’ on your printer for any text.  Print it out and leave to cool…

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2.  Position the transfer on your paper sack, being sure to leave enough space at the top if you want to roll it over as I’ve done here (I like the contrast between the white of the outer sack and the brown lining).

3. Iron on a medium heat to transfer the image or text; you might need a lower setting than with fabric to avoid scorching

4.  Leave to cool, peel off the transfer paper and admire your handiwork.

5.  Fill with animals, laundry, craft materials, family members *delete as applicable

Printed Paper Sacks

Job done!

These would also look gorgeous at Christmas as personalised gift sacks (and require a little less effort than these!).

Have a wonderful weekend…

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DIY Bear Bag (made from a paper sack)

A Cretan Escape

Cretan stairs

Kalimera! We’re just back from a sun-drenched, chilled-out week on the Greek island of Crete; a spontaneous, late-minute booking that was exactly what we needed.

One of the things that struck me the most about Crete was the effortless beauty in everything, and the radiant, kaleidoscopic colour to be found everywhere across the island;  every shade of blue, from the cerulean and turquoise of the sea, which changed constantly as the sun rose, radiated and then began to set…

Agios Nicolaos

sea tide

Ocean tide at night

To the cobalt-blue of doors, shutters and windows, and the paintbox of shades found in every village street

Cretan doorway

Cretan shutters

Cretan doorways

In Agios Nicolaos and Elounda every corner and side street revealed new surprises,  from a beautiful mosaic which covered the entire wall of a kids store, to endless inviting spots to sip a coffee (or a chilled glass of rosé)  …so we did.

Many times.

Mosaic in Agioa Nicolaos, CreteCafe in Agios Nicolaos Crete

Restaurant in Elounda in Crete

We ate freshly-caught sardines, octopus (strung on washing lines in the harbours to dry!),  salty, crumbling local cheeses, olives and roasted peppers.  Small plates that slipped down a treat so that all moderation was lost.  No matter.  We visited a local co-operative that produces olive oil for all the local villages; most families own small groves of trees and bring their harvest each year to be processed for oil.  Alex the owner told Harry that the rite of passage for each boy in becoming a man is the moment he plants his own olive tree; he was enchanted. We tasted the oils as you might do wine, learning to distinguish between the buttery, peppery, citrussy and smooth tastes of each.  Harry was the expert in no time, developing an impressive palate.

A sombre, arresting highlight of the week was a visit to Spinalonga, an island made famous a few years ago by this novel, which was home to a leper colony for around fifty years at the start of the last century.  Within days of a leprosy diagnosis, you would be sent to Spinalonga – children and adults alike, usually travelling alone – for the rest of your life.  Spinalonga was haunting and beautiful; the streets seemed to still echo with life and memories.

Spinalonga Island, Crete

New arrivals would enter through a tunnel known as Dante’s gate (below), not knowing what they would find on the other side of this one-way trip into a new world, having left everything behind.

Dante's Gate, Spinalonga Island

We visited at the end of the day and had the island almost to ourselves, bathed in the fading light.

spinalonga1 spinalonga chapel

Days in Crete were exceptionally hot, and surprisingly windy; in July and August the Etesian winds are at their peak, blowing across the island with such a force that it feels like facing into a hairdryer for hours on end. We heard a lovely local saying;  ’the wind sleeps with his wife at night’, retreating and fading at sunset.  In the late afternoons we’d settle in the shade, out of the sun and wind, and Harry and I had a go at painting the sea…

I’d brought a travel set of paints with us and a palette and pack of blank watercolour postcards, thinking we might make use of them.  We mixed up the paints and used a piece of sea sponge to create waves and foam;

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I poured some hotel-room shower gel into a cup and squeezed in some paint, blowing with a straw to create bubbles so we could experiment with foamy effects.  Messy but brilliant fun.  Then for a final touch, we cut out sardine shapes from tissue paper and glued them over the top, for a collage of all-things Crete to send home in the mail…

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Efharisto, Crete!  Thank you for a wonderful week of sunshine and new adventures.  We will be back.

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Resurfacing! (and The Shipping Forecast…)

Well, it’s certainly good to be back.

A crazy few weeks of work, business-travel and a greater than usual number of plates to spin and balls to juggle has meant that creative things have taken a backseat of late.

But not anymore; the days are long now, with August just around the corner bringing a welcome reprieve and some headspace once more.

So let’s begin again…

paper sculpture by katescreativespace

Remember the old shipping maps, that I found in a vintage shop of a couple of years ago? One evening last week I unfolded a map, took out my trusty craft knife and had a go at creating a paper-boat seascape, setting a fisherman out to sail;

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Here it is!

The Shipping Forecast by Katescreativespace

Close-up of Shipping Forecast paper cutting

I began by making a simple paper boat (instructions here).  Paper boat-making is about as close as I come to origami (apart from these stars, which are just as simple), but it’s a very lovely throwback to childhood and simple pleasures.  Then I cut out the base for the paper sculpture; three tiers of paper waves, with a sliver of foamboard glued between each of them for definition and layering.

Layering paper in paper cutting

And now the hard bit; I used a sharp craft knife to carefully cut out one side of the boat cabin, and then cut a similar-sized piece of translucent paper to glue in its place.  Freehand, I lightly drew and carved out shapes of a fisherman, wheel, lantern and a small shoal of fish, before sticking them into place.  As a final touch, I pushed a battery t-light into the folds of the boat…

Turning paper cutting into luminaries

 

To create a mantelpiece luminary!

Paper boat luminary

If the paper-cutting feels prohibitively complicated, stick to making simple paper boats which still look beautiful with a battery light inside them.  A fleet of them down the centre of a dining table at night, or an armada of tiny paper ships floating on a pond or a pool if you have one would look lovely!

p.s., popcorn boats, Driftwood boats, and a ship for the littlest pirates.  Plus another way to make luminaries.

popcorn boats

Have a wonderful weekend!

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Swoonworthy ‘Shrooms

DIY oyster mushrooms

When we were children, my mum used to take us foraging for mushrooms in the woods, which we’d then bring home and fry in butter to eat on toast for tea (often with clods of earth still attached; we had a rather reckless regard for hygiene).  In those pre-internet days, my mother relied heavily on a rather hazy and abstract recollection of which mushrooms were safe to eat and which might be deadly;  meals were thus always charged with a certain frisson of danger, and we watched each other attentively for signs of imminent poisoning.

Despite this cavalier approach, most of us made it to adulthood and we all still enjoy eating mushrooms; so much so in fact that I’ve always quite fancied the idea of growing my own.  The internet abounds with handy instructions on how to grow a forest of fungi from the pages of an old book, old coffee grounds, tree logs – you name it, there’s a tutorial.

I was fleetingly obsessed with the idea of using books, perhaps some of my book-folded sculptures, to grow beautiful, sculptural fields of oyster mushrooms.  Then I looked more closely at the instructions for this, which seem to involve lots of soaking in bathtubs (the books, not oneself, sadly), freezing, spore-scattering and alternating between pitch black and sunlight, all whilst maintaining a steady temperature.  Really, it wasn’t for me.  I needed something that thrived rather more on neglect and distraction.

And then I found it…

I bought one of these ready-made kits which promised a bloom of mushrooms within a couple of weeks of activation (kits are widely available online and in garden centres from lots of suppliers).  With this one, you simply take the packet out of the box, soak it overnight, drain and stand it upright again and wait for the mushrooms to appear.  Like so:

Msuhroom growing from a pack

You are supposed to spritz the pack lightly with water twice a day, but – confession time – I began mine the day before I left for a work trip to the US and returned after 6 days to find, magically ….this!

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The box had been roundly ignored by all remaining household members, and had quietly produced a magnificent bloom of hot pink oyster mushrooms, which apparently arrived overnight on day 4.  Once grown, you simply twist the mushrooms off and they’re ready to be rinsed and cooked. Don’t they look beautiful?

Pink oyster mushrooms

They’re currently sitting on a chopping board on the kitchen counter, looking gorgeous and awaiting recipe inspiration.  In the meantime, the pack promises a second yield so I am hoping another week of neglect might provide a second Saturday-night feast.  Let’s see.

Have you tried growing mushrooms?  Any luck with a more green-fingered, spore-based approach?  Having tried this easy option, I’m inspired to experiment a bit more…

Have a wonderful weekend!

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Sun-dried* tomato bruschetta (*no sun needed!)

Homemade sun dried tomatoes

Have you ever tried making sun-dried tomatoes at home?  These beauties don’t require days of drying in radiant sunshine; instead, you can while away an afternoon reducing them in the oven to a delicious confit intensity.

Yesterday we had a long, lazy day planned so in the morning I bought a couple of punnets of mixed tomatoes and decided to give slow-roasting a whirl.  It felt like an appropriately Sunday-ish job; low maintenance, and ultimately resulting in good things to eat. I set the oven to 120 degrees and began slicing…

chopped tomatoes

Sundried tomatoes benefit from a few generous glugs of oil, plus whatever herbs you have to hand.   I used basil oil for an added kick of flavour (try adding bay leaves, rosemary, fresh garlic cloves and black pepper for an infusion of the mediterranean, or chili pepper flakes for heat);

over dried tomatoes

Check them every hour or so, and after 3hrs they should be done; in the meantime the house will gently fill with the smells of summer – that, I think, is the best bit.

(Actually no; eating them is the best bit).

I grilled slices of baguette and spread them with goats cheese and a dash of balsamic vinegar before arranging the tomatoes and drizzling with oil.  The only thing to know about these is that you can never stop at just one…

Homemade bruschetta

Any leftover tomatoes will keep in a jar in the fridge for a couple of weeks (top up the oil when you bottle them).

Have a wonderful week!

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The Scrap-Fabric Table Runner

DIY Fabric Table Runner

This is a story that began with a dress.  This dress. I bought it a couple of years ago, and it was beautiful, and hung just right, until I discovered – belatedly – that it had HUGE pockets.  And once my hands found these pockets, I couldn’t seem to stop filling them with things, until one day I realised that the dress looked less like a tailored silk sheath and more like a tent that I was using as cover to smuggle contraband goods.  The perfect dress for petty theft, perhaps, but not quite the elegant look I was aiming for.

So I took the pockets out and removed the problem.  They were so beautiful that I couldn’t throw them away; I kept them in my fabric drawer along with leftover bits and pieces of material from all kinds of projects.  On a rainy Sunday last month, I finally dug them out and began sorting and sifting through other pieces to see what might complement the colours.

I found a large square of turquoise cotton, unpicked the pockets to form four identical shapes, and then backed them with iron-on fusible paper before mounting on the fabric.  Sort of like a set of balancing bowls, or mussel shells;

silk pockets cut open and used for a fabric collage

Then I layered other colours against it and picked out a few in silver, navy and duck-egg shades.  I cut them into slices, vaguely but not precisely measuring each to ensure a kind of symmetry.  Then backed them together; pinning and stitching, pinning and stitching;

making a table runner

Until it began to look like this!

Making a scrap fabric table runner

The edges remained imprecise for a long time; when I had the final length I wanted I trimmed them down to an even length and marked a 1″ seam for folding in.

fabric scrap table runner

With the runner nearly 3m long by now, I did have to buy more fabric to back it; I chose a heavyish, velvety curtain fabric that gives weight to the runner and ensures it doesn’t slip and slide around.  As with Harry’s baby-clothes quilt, my workmanship on the sewing does not bear close scrutiny, and my seams are rambling and a little slapdash. But still, I am left with an almost stained-glass like creation that looks good on the table, and equally good draped over the end of the bed.  A shorter length would make a lovely, vibrant evening wrap – for this one though you’d need the shoulders of a line-backer to carry it off with aplomb…

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Have a wonderful week!

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A Drawing Wall!

Wall-hung drawing paper rolL!

When we updated Harry’s room earlier this year, there’s one more thing that we added – almost as an afterthought – that has proven to be a HUGE hit.

Whilst rummaging in the loft, we found an old wooden curtain rail which we cut down to size and threaded with a 20m roll of brown parcel paper.  We mounted it on a spare sliver of wall in Harry’s bedroom…

How to make a drawing roll

..added a simple painted wooden baton at the bottom the hold the paper in place, and hey presto; a drawing wall came to life!

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It’s become a kind of collaborative family art space and messaging board.  We practice numbers on it (times-tables, exhaustively…), see who can draw the best elephant or sea monster or ice-cream flavour* (*me; Harry; Dad).  When Harry won an art prize at school, I sneaked upstairs before bedtime to leave this trophy in pride of place…

Brown paper roll for family messages

Here’s a few tips if you’re making your own..

  • Source your paper roll first before cutting the curtain pole down to size.  Paper tends to come in standard widths, so start with the end in mind.  Amazon and office supply stores are great for white and brown paper rolls.
  • Choose paper strong enough to withstand pulling down and pressing on, but not so thick that it won’t roll easily or tear off when you’re done – we used inexpensive 100gsm parcel paper.
  • To roll the paper onto the curtain pole, tape along one long edge to hold it in place and then roll up, positioning it so that the roll is to the front and the paper drop to the rear as shown (like a toilet roll!)

Wall-mounted drawing paper roll

  • When you’ve filled a length of paper, you can either tear it off or roll it up again at the bottom, pulling down to create new space.  If you do this, you can ultimately rewind it facing the other way to create a double-sided roll.
  • We used art pastels initially on the paper which gave great vibrant colours, but do tend to rub off on fingers (and wall, and floor, and duvet cover) – then I found these bright chalk pens which work beautifully and give rich colours without the mess.  You just have to be disciplined about putting the tops back on again afterwards.

Harry’s works a treat in his bedroom, but this would also look great in a kitchen for shopping lists, family messages or general creativity. Enjoy!

Family art wall in a kids bedroom

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The Hare and the Carrot

Hare and Carrot Cake

Last weekend I made a cake for Easter.  Not a fruit or Simnel cake (simple tastes abound in our household), but instead a rainbow cake, frosted and decorated festively with a carrot, which soon attracted these hares…

Hares & Carrot Cake

It’s one of those cakes that is far simpler to make than it may look;

  • The rainbow cake recipe and technique is on the blog here, and for the frosting I used Betty Crocker’s own trusted recipe (so simple, but so good).
  • To make the shards around the side, I melted a pack of these and smoothed the mixture out between two sheets of greaseproof paper, before rolling it up quickly like a swiss roll.  The Candy Melts harden quickly, and when unrolled again break into shards which I gently pressed into the frosting around the sides of the cake.  You can find them in Lakeland and Hobbycraft in the UK, and in craft stores and supermarkets in the US and Canada.
  • The carrot is a paper-and-raffia Easter decoration that I simply pierced with a wooden skewer, then pushed the skewer down into the cake to hold it in place (remove before serving!).  If you made an actual carrot cake, this would look even better.
  • The mischievous hares?  Again, they were Easter decorations designed to be hung up; I snipped off the hanging threads and let them loose on the cake…

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After two days, this was all I managed to rescue for a photo :-)

Rainbow cake

p.s.  On a related subject; a campaign has been launched by the youngest member of the family who is adamant that what our family needs is a pet rabbit.  Have you ever had a rabbit, and do they make easy pets?  Perhaps we won’t start with one of these

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Another Place

Neither From Nor Towards

We had an extraordinary adventure last weekend, venturing north to Chester, Liverpool and Yorkshire to visit a couple of places I’ve always wanted to see.

The Yorkshire Sculpture Park covers 500 acres and promises ‘art without walls’; hundreds of astonishing, permanent and rotating works by artists such as Ai Weiwei, Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore.

Housed in the Chapel amidst the grounds was a breathtaking installation by artist Cornelia Parker (above and below).   Neither From Nor Towards is a suspended work of hundreds of weathered bricks from a row of houses destroyed when cliff-top erosion on the south coast caused them to fall into the sea.   The rounding of the bricks is organic, caused by the battering of the waves and relentless tides before they were eventually retrieved from the water.  It was mesmerising and beautiful, and for a few minutes we were the only visitors in the room.

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One of the wonderful things about YSP is how interactive and accessible all of the sculpture is.  Even for this most fragile and stunning work, there were no ropes or barriers, and Harry was immediately offered a stool and a drawing box so he could have a go at recreating it;

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Just outside the Chapel stands Iron tree by Ai Weiwei; a 6m high tree made of 99 iron casts from different trees, roughly bolted and screwed together;

An Wei

We roamed through the woods, which looked beautiful, still strewn with spring bluebells and with wintery light radiating through the trees (it was freezing that day; bright but cold..)

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We spent hours there, and took hundreds of photographs (I will spare you, I promise), and touched and stroked and admired a myriad of different sculptures, big and small.  If you ever have the opportunity to go there, I can’t recommend it enough.

The next day, we went to another place.  Literally, to Another Place; Antony Gormley’s iconic line of standing figures which are set along more than a mile of the tideline of Crosby Beach, looking out to sea….

Antony Gormley_Another Place Screen Shot 2017-04-21 at 10.58.48

The pictures above are from the first installation of the figures, at Cuxhaven on Germany at an estuary of the Elbe, before they were relocated to the UK.  Gormley said of the sculpting process ‘The sculptures are made from 17 body-casts taken from my body (protected by a thin layer of wrapping plastic). The sculptures are all standing in a similar way, with the lungs more or less inflated and their postures carrying different degrees of tension or relaxation’.   I think I would have erred towards a posture of tension myself, if wrapped in plastic and encased in plaster.  Here he is at work, on a different project;

Antony Gormley

Gormley at work

We went to Crosby beach at first light, and they looked equally powerful; rusted now and covered in barnacles;

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Extraordinary, and beautiful, and powerful enough to have stayed in my mind constantly all week.  It made me remember how much I love to visit places like this (and how easy it is to get derailed by motherhood and plate-spinning and the guilt of self-indulgence. I needn’t have worried; we all had a ball…).

Where have you been lately that’s moved you or blown your mind?  I’d love to create a new list of must-visit places…

Have a wonderful weekend!

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All photos my own apart from those of Cuxhaven, via here and of Gormley’s Domain Field workshop via here.

 

 

Happy Easter!

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Happy Easter weekend!

I hope that you’re having a lovely one…

Harry’s been cutting out pictures from junk-shop books to decorate Easter bags;

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…Whilst I’ve been harvesting a couple of branches of magnolia to place in a vase in the kitchen, strung with egg decorations (Spring and Easter have collided deliciously in the garden this year; the lawn is a drift of apple blossom and colour).IMG_6730

It’s been (just) warm enough to eat outside, so I used first-of-the-season Coeur de Boeuf tomatoes for these very moreish simple tarts;

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Just cut a round of pre-made puff pastry, spread with feta or goats cheese, and place a slice of tomato on top.  Bake for 10mins before leaving to cool.  Decorate with olive and basil and drizzle with a little olive oil and balsamic glaze.  Eat when ever-so-slightly still warm, preferably with a glass of sauvignon blanc – and home-grown cress of course!.

Coeur de Lion tomato tarts

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Have a wonderful (rest of the) weekend!

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