kids craft

Singing in the Rain!

Singing in the Rain Again

It’s been raining, raining, raining here, so a few days ago we decided to bring the stormy weather indoors so that we could dance in the rain without getting wet…

Our very own raincloud has lasted for over a week now and makes us smile whenever we walk under it.  Oh, and it only takes an hour or so to make, with a bit of careful scissoring and a lot of puff (note to self; buy a balloon pump next time…). Grab an umbrella and join us!

Paper Raindrops DIY

For the raindrops, we cut shapes out of sheets of craft paper in tonal blues (I used these, but any will do).  Here’s a template I made (download via the PDF link below) if you want to have a go; I’ve coloured the shapes in blue so that you can simply print onto white cardstock as well.

Raindrop Template from KatesCreativeSpace

 

Lay 2-4 of the same-sized shapes on top of each other, and run through a sewing machine to stitch them together before folding them open to form a 3-d shape.  If these words strike fear in your heart, you can fold and glue them together instead.  The brilliant Kate at MiniEco has a tutorial for making paper rain without the need for sewing (she made a paper mobile). Use different coloured shapes together for the loveliest effects…

Tonal paper raindrops

If you’re sewing like we did, allow long lengths of cotton at each end, and use these to knot the raindrops together to form strands.  If you’re using the fold & glue approach, just glue or tape lengths of cotton to each drop to attach it.  I used blue thread because it’s what we had to hand on a dull and overcast day, but if I was doing this again I’d choose invisible thread for maximum aesthetic effect!

Raindrops and balloon clouds

Then, simply blow up a handful of white and grey balloons, tie them together and tape your raindrop strands to the bottom of the balloon cloud.  I strung my cloud up from our conservatory roof and it looks very beautiful and enticing; perfect for a wonderfully dry dance in the rain….

Balloon raincloud and paper raindrops

 

Rain Dancing

Making rain clouds is not a new idea, and there are a myriad of different ways you can try, depending on how permanent you want your art to be and how much time and patience you have (try typing ‘DIY cloud’ into Pinterest and be astonished by possibility..).  We were looking to fill a rainy half-term afternoon, and tailored our approach to fit, but if you’re prepared to invest more time, have a look at these beautiful papier-mâché library installations by Hafuboti.

And now the skies are clear, and Spring suddenly feels like it is on the horizon; our rain dance might just have brought the sun!

DIY Indoor Raincloud

Raindrop Template from KatesCreativeSpace

By the way, our gorgeous rainbow umbrella is from here; it caught my eye as we skidded through the retail area of SFO airport last October as the final call for our flight boomed around the halls – it was worth the panic; it  makes rainy day walks an absolute joy :-)

 

How to get your 7-a-day of Fruit & Veg.

Paper Fruit from katescreativespace

This week the British government announced that we should each be eating at least 7 portions of fruit and veg every day for optimal health and longevity.  Apparently, the raisins in a fruit & nut chocolate bar don’t count, and nor, really, do the dried banana chips I carry around in my bag.  To bolster our household fruit supplies, I have ingeniously resorted to Pinterest and the beautiful DIY fruit bowl templates created for the wonderful Mr Printables site here.  They may not be strictly edible, but they’re certainly very decorative – and great fun to make.

DIY Paper Fruit


When I stumble across lovely things like this which catch my eye I tend to download them and then save them for rainy nights in; this week gave us a couple, so Harry and I did some scissor-practice and wielded our glue sticks to great success.  The fruit are described as toys, though they’re not really resilient enough for any kind of hard-loving or action play; ours simply sit on the mantelpiece looking cheerful and decorative.  I printed them out as supersize templates (download them and print at 150% if your printer can cope with A3; or blow them up at a copy shop).  This makes them larger than life and much easier to fold and stick, especially for little fingers.  A great project for the Easter holidays, or for grown-ups (this particular craft project  was mainly for me, I confess…).  You see them here on Harry’s play kitchen scales and picnic basket – each piece of fruit is about 15-20cm in height.

Paper Fruit Picnic Basket

They are so tactile and colourful; if Harry was younger I’d be tempted to string these into a mobile or a garland for his bedroom (which we’re doing-up currently; more on that soon).  A lovely ornament for a nursery perhaps; out of reach of curious, uncoordinated hands but perfect for capturing attention and imagination.

Tempting paper Fruit


Before I go and rearrange my virtual fruit bowl, thank you SO much for the lovely comments on last week’s post; I’m delighted that the rabbit drawing/download has been useful and inspired a good few projects -it’s always a joy to hear when something has worked and been used in other creations.  Easter preparations continue here, albeit amongst the frenzy of work & deadlines, and a new backdrop of mists and frost.  More pics and news from the home front next week.

Have a good week, wherever you are and whatever you’re upto.

handbag logo

A spot of DIY Book Art, and a Giveaway…

DIY Book Art

Firstly a huge thank you for the lovely comments about Harry’s playroom and the Book Nook; it quite made my week.  The folded book art seemed to capture a few imaginations, so this week here’s a mini tutorial on how I made the various books above and below, using a pile of 20p junk shop books.  Trial, error, glue and a large glass of wine all played a role in the end results, but if you’re inspired to have a go, read on.  If the idea of laboriously folding your way through a fusty and dog-eared old novel is about as appealing as dental extraction, whisk straight to the end and allow me to tempt you with a giveaway instead.

book art tutorial

1. Creating a hanging ‘Cascade’ book

I made this one last night using a small (6 inch) hardback Peppa Pig book from a charity shop.  Find any hardback book; kids’ books are great for this as they don’t have many pages.  You’ll also need glue or double-sided sticky tape, a round pencil or pen (for rolling the paper), and a stack of paper for your cascades.  I used Papermania solid card stock, which I adore, but anything will do; brightly coloured tonal papers give this lovely effect, but clashing rainbow colours or plain paper also look great, depending on where you intend to hang it.

  • Start by rolling each page over on itself and sticking it in place so you have a series of gentle loops.  Doing this will gently force the book covers out to lie flat (or at least to be held open), and create a kind of concertina of folds for you to tuck your cascading pages into.
  • Take a series of sheets of paper that are approximately the same size as the original book pages, and again gently roll each one over on itself and stick the ends together, giving you a selection of tubular, petal-shaped inserts.  Don’t use too much pressure here; you want rounded curves rather than creases.
  • Tuck in your pages randomly between the folded book pages, and secure in place with glue or tape.
  • Add a few more pages by taping these to your first layer of inserts
  • Next, take some strips of contrasting colour paper and roll them up in a pencil, before gently pulling out to give a tendril-like effect.  Glue these in place between the lowest layer of looped paper.
  • Finally, screw a small eyelet hook into the centre of the cardboard book spine and use this to hang it from the ceiling or a wall hook.
  • You can make these as big and fluid as you like, by adding layer after layer; it would make a beautiful mobile or sculpture trailing down a wall.. when I get the time I’m thinking of making a huge, floor to ceiling one in muted papers for a corner of our bedroom.

cascade book

2. Creating Rolled Books

Roll-folding books

These are the easiest to make, if you choose the right kind of book.  They look beautiful when stacked in loose piles, but also when hung as barrel-like pendants.  First, decide whether you are going to fold just the middle of the book like the first one above, or whether you want to create a whole rolled book (middle).  You can also leave a single sheaf of pages standing proud (above right) for added interest.

  • For a ‘barrel’ book, choose a chunky book (200-300 pages); the width will help it hold its shape. First, ease off the paperback book cover and any loose pages which come away with it.  Flex the spine a bit until it loosens – as if it’s been read many many times.  You’re hopefully using old junk shop books so this won’t take long.
  • Glue a long piece of string along the exposed spine; this will allow you to hang the book when finished and is much easier than trying to thread string through the finished piece.
  • Open the book in the middle and take a section of about 20 pages and roll it into the spine.  Do this 3 or 4 times and they will start to hold their form and push the book outwards.  You can glue or tape these loops in place by gluing the upper most sheet and pressing firmly into place, but often you won’t need to use any glue at all.

rolled book close up

  • Once you get to the end of the book, go back to the middle and work around the other half, doing the same.  The book will naturally form an increasingly tight barrel, and you will end up tucking your loops in. Glue your final loop in place and – hey presto – you have a rolled barrel book.  If you want to hang it up, thread a bead to the bottom of the spine string to hold it in place and for the book  to ‘sit on’, and you’re done.

Display below from Anthropologie

anthropologie

3. Folded Books

These are very simple but a little more time-consuming.  I showed you one last week which involved folding just a section of the book.  If you follow the same principle and work your way all through the book, you’ll end up with a diamond-like hanging pendant like this;

folded book pendant

I made these by the making the same two simple folds – just over and over again.  If you’re making a hanging pendant, choose a thick book (at least 300 pages) so you get a nice full shape.  And yes, that’s 600 folds, hence the large glass of wine.  Other learnings; don’t do this whilst your 3yr old son is still awake and, inspired by the crafting environment, is demanding to be allowed to do some ‘scissor practice’ on your book.  Also don’t practice your folding technique on the paperback being read by your husband, even if it was lying temptingly on the table; it won’t be appreciated. So, take your book and simply fold once to the centre;

fold 1

And twice to bring the top corner down to meet the fold; then keep doing this for every single page.  As before, if you want to hang these ultimately, glue some cord down the external spine before you begin folding, leaving a good length hanging out at either end.

fold 2

Once you’ve got the hang of folding, you can experiment with punches too; I used a circle punch to take a slice out of each page of this one below.

DIY folded book pendant

Phew; enough curling and folding; I’m now bedecked with small paper cuts and doubtless the beginnings of repetitive strain injury, but I do have a beautiful shelf full of repurposed books.  let me know how you get on..

And finally.. I have a $100 gift certificate for US craft supplier the Shoppe at Somerset to give away.  I received this as a ‘thank-you’ for a piece that I wrote for one of their publications, but whilst the e-store is filled with a myriad of tempting things, prohibitive transatlantic shipping costs mean that I’d much rather a reader of this blog is able to benefit and to spend every cent on frivolous but delicious craft materials.  If you’d like to win this, just let me know in a comment below and Harry will do the big draw on Monday.

vibrant book cascade

Happy folding (and wine drinking…)!