papercraft

Altered Envelopes

Altered Envelopes cover page

This week’s post involves some of our absolute favourite things; cutting and sticking and mail and books.  Specifically, cutting up and sticking books to make mail.

It all began with a book sale by our local library, selling off old, dog-eared copies of children’s books for 10p each.  10p!! We bought everything we could find with gorgeous pictures, and then – cover your eyes – we cut them all up.

IMG_0718

IMG_6519

We cut carefully around all the best pictures and then stuck them onto blank envelopes to make a personalised set of mail for Harry to use…

IMG_7297

In each case, our only rule was that there had to be enough space to write the recipient’s name and maybe attach a postage stamp, which in practice meant we could fit on some REALLY LARGE BIRDS;

IMG_6505 Altered Envelopes- peacock!

And a very friendly-looking elephant!

altered envelopes 8

A cheeky, cupcake-eating fox!

altered envelopes 4

A dog who looks like he’d really like to become your pet…

altered envelopes 2

Really, really like to. Huh, huh? C’mon, let me follow you home!

altered envelopes 7

Or if you like your pets a bit feistier, what about this fellow?

altered envelopes 1

He might want to eat you or he might just want to play.  It’s a gamble.

altered envelopes 3

I used these big round labels to create a focal point for addresses;

Altered Envelopes 2

Sometimes a whole picture makes for fun address-writing…

Altered envelopes 1

So now Harry has a stack of altered envelopes and notecards to encourage the forgotten art of letter-writing…and the former library books get a second life.

use old books to make altered envelopes!

p.s.

The cheat’s guide to calligraphy

Marbled paper

Introducing children to the magical art of snail mail

Have a great week!

handbag logo

 

Resurfacing! (and The Shipping Forecast…)

Well, it’s certainly good to be back.

A crazy few weeks of work, business-travel and a greater than usual number of plates to spin and balls to juggle has meant that creative things have taken a backseat of late.

But not anymore; the days are long now, with August just around the corner bringing a welcome reprieve and some headspace once more.

So let’s begin again…

paper sculpture by katescreativespace

Remember the old shipping maps, that I found in a vintage shop of a couple of years ago? One evening last week I unfolded a map, took out my trusty craft knife and had a go at creating a paper-boat seascape, setting a fisherman out to sail;

IMG_7723

Here it is!

The Shipping Forecast by Katescreativespace

Close-up of Shipping Forecast paper cutting

I began by making a simple paper boat (instructions here).  Paper boat-making is about as close as I come to origami (apart from these stars, which are just as simple), but it’s a very lovely throwback to childhood and simple pleasures.  Then I cut out the base for the paper sculpture; three tiers of paper waves, with a sliver of foamboard glued between each of them for definition and layering.

Layering paper in paper cutting

And now the hard bit; I used a sharp craft knife to carefully cut out one side of the boat cabin, and then cut a similar-sized piece of translucent paper to glue in its place.  Freehand, I lightly drew and carved out shapes of a fisherman, wheel, lantern and a small shoal of fish, before sticking them into place.  As a final touch, I pushed a battery t-light into the folds of the boat…

Turning paper cutting into luminaries

 

To create a mantelpiece luminary!

Paper boat luminary

If the paper-cutting feels prohibitively complicated, stick to making simple paper boats which still look beautiful with a battery light inside them.  A fleet of them down the centre of a dining table at night, or an armada of tiny paper ships floating on a pond or a pool if you have one would look lovely!

p.s., popcorn boats, Driftwood boats, and a ship for the littlest pirates.  Plus another way to make luminaries.

popcorn boats

Have a wonderful weekend!

handbag logo

DIY Paper Marbling with Metallics

DIY Shaving Foam Paper Marbling

I’ve always loved marbled papers, ever since a trip to Venice as a teenager when I stumbled across a tiny paper shop called Il Papiro that was filled from floor to ceiling with hand-decorated sheets in every hue.  Even then (especially then!), they were way beyond my price range, so I admired them and reluctantly left them behind.  Finally, an unimaginable number of years later, I discovered how to make marbled paper at home.  The trick?  The cheapest shaving foam you can find.

In truth, I am pretty sure that this is not the secret ingredient that Italian marblers have been using since the fifteenth century, but still – it works a treat.

DIy marbled paper from KatesCreativeSpace

Firstly, go shopping for several cans of shaving foam.  Ignore the strange looks that this provokes; try not to appear as someone wresting with a secret, hidden, hairiness.  Then find yourself some disposable foil trays, food colouring and a syringe or baster / pipette.  Latex gloves too, if your fingers will appear in public soon afterwards; temporary staining is a potential hazard.  Let’s begin…

Fill your tray with spray-can shaving foam.  Make sure it’s the old fashioned cheap foam and not hipster shaving gel; you want plenty of ‘bouff’…

Foil tray filled with shaving foam (DIY marbled paper)

Then using the syringe or pipette, squirt drops of food colouring randomly around the tray.  Here, I used two shades of blue food dye (a turquoise and a deeper blue), and also some gold paint;

Mixing foam with food dye for marbling

Using a wooden skewer, gently stir and swirl the dye around until it’s mixed loosely together and there are no big pools or stripes of colour.  Don’t blend it in completely; you just want it stirred together, like this;

DIY shaving foam paper marbling

And then quickly lay your piece of paper on top, face-down, and push it gently flat so that all parts of it are covered by the foam mix

DIY paper marbling step 4

Lift up the paper and lay it down flat.  It will look deeply unimpressive.  You will be covered in foam.  You will despair.  But wait.  Wait just a moment, because this next bit is where the magic happens…

DIY foam paper marbling

Take a clean ruler and place it along your sheet, and pull down smoothly, wiping the foam away.  It’s awesome.  You will feel like an artist…

IMG_5072

Use kitchen roll to wipe away any residual foam, and leave the paper to dry.

You can get a second print from the tray, but it will be a bit blurrier and less defined than the first.  Try different colour mixes and experiment with using shaded papers.  My favourite is pale blue paper with blue food dye and silver paint; it gives an ethereal and delicate marbling pattern that’s perfect for making writing paper…

IMG_5136

Deeper and more vibrant mixes are great for making gift tags, or cutting out as envelope liners like below;

DIY Marbling Envelope Liners

Make sheet after sheet, and use them in everything you can think of…

DIY Paper marbling with shaving foam

Oh, and happy Sunday, wherever you are and whatever you’re doing! (Do this now; do this instead…)

handbag logo

Crafty projects using holiday photos

DIY Holiday Card Making

Recently, we had a beautiful long weekend in Christchurch, on the Dorset coast. It was a miraculously hot weekend in an otherwise gloomy spell of weather, so we had 3 glorious days of crabbing, rockpool exploring, sand-castle building and a myriad of other retro beach pursuits.  Here’s a few photos, if you’d like to see;

Christchurch harbour

Make a wishMake a wish and blow

IMG_7903 IMG_7978 IMG_8059 IMG_7818

mermaids

(it took about five showers to wash out all the sand after that one, by the way…)

Kite fliying on the beach

And then when we returned home, I got creative with the photographs…

DIY Photo Notepaper

I’d taken a lot of pics with sea and sky, so decided to make this photo into notepaper for Harry; I cropped it slightly (and superimposed a different kite that was a bit more recognisable!), and then simply printed out several copies onto matt white letter paper.  Harry wrote to his godmother to tell her about our weekend…

Photo letter paper

I also printed some fun envelopes with a photograph I took of the texture of a beach hut wall, with an address bar of weathered wood.  There’s a downloadable PDF of both of these images below if you want to print your own;

DIY Writing Paper from family photos

Beach Notepaper

Weathered Wood Envelope

You could also add text to make a poster…

 

The cure for anything

But my favourite project was this;

DIY Beach Hut Cards

I used one of my photos of the old beach huts at Mudeford, and then used the ‘remove background’ tool in Powerpoint to isolate the hut itself.  I printed it onto thin white card (step 1), then cut out the beach hut.  I printed photos of Harry to fit the size of the drop-front of the hut (step 3), and cut around them.  Then..

  • Using a craft knife, cut around the sides and top of the white hatch section, and folded it down to create a flap
  • Pasted a photo behind the flap
  • Mounted the beach hut onto a pre-folded piece of white card, and trimmed the top to fit the shape of the beach hut roof…

Beach hut card DIY

…to create this fun card!

Beach hut photo card

holiday cards from photos

We folded Harry’s letter into the card, tucked it into our homemade envelope, and posted it off.

Here’s a free graphic of the beach hut which you can download to make your own if you like (instead of a photo, you could turn it into an invitation to a party or event, with the details hidden behind the fold-down flap..).

Old Beach Hut image

Have a wonderful weekend when it comes!

handbag logo

Altered Books for Little People

 

Making Creative Colouring Books for Kids

It’s that stage of the Easter Holidays where time seems to drag and even Harry occasionally thinks wistfully of school restarting, so we’ve been extra-resourceful this week and have had a go at making altered sketchbooks, inspired by this lovely – and very simple – idea from Rock & Pebble; a kids’ sketchbook shaped like a house, ready to be filled with drawings and pictures.  Aren’t they cool?

Dollhouse book by Rock & Pebble

You can’t buy these in the UK (and at $27, you might just pause anyway), so we thought we’d have a go ourselves and raided Harry’s art cupboard, where I always keep a stash of bulk-buy sketchbooks.  We decided to have a go at making a castle book, so I carefully measured and drew turrets, and used a craft knife and safety ruler to cut them out (metal rulers like these with a finger groove are ideal and minimise the risk of profuse amounts of blood on your castle, however authentic that may look)…

Making altered notebooks

We then took a second notebook and drew and cut out a simple slanted roof, and added doors to each, like so…

Altered notebooks for kids

I had some leftover brick-printed paper from Harry’s knights and castles party last year, so we glued this onto the castle book and added a couple of paper flags for extra style..

DIY Castle Sketchbook

And Harry immediately settled down to colouring and creating, drawing knights, arrows, shields and battles…

Altered Castle Notebook

Castle colouring book DIY Knights colouring book DIY

Yesterday, we decorated the cover of the house book together, adding brick paper, shingle roof tiles and other bits and bobs of decoration.  We love how it turned out…

Harrys House Book customised drawing book for kids

Harrys House Book DIY Colouring book for kids

The inside is still invitingly blank, and our plan for tonight is to take the Ikea catalogue, a pair of scissors each, some glue and a huge array of snacks (it is the holidays after all), and collage a room full of all of our favourite things onto the pages… watch this space!

Have a wonderful rest of the weekend, wherever you are and whatever you’re doing….

handbag logo

 

DIY customised drawing books for kids

Last-minute Christmas decorations: Simple 3D Stars

Simple 3D Stars tutorial

How are you, are you all set for Christmas?  We’re feeling festive  tucked away here in our small corner of the world, after a weekend of visits from family and friends, the official end of school and work, and the house now bedecked with lights and decorations (I’ll share a few pics tomorrow in a final post).  One last-minute addition has been these simple paper stars (above and below), made using this brilliant template created by Kate Lilley at Minieco… they look like beautifully crafted origami stars, but are a little easier for those who are quickly baffled by the dexterity needed in the twisting and folding of the authentic Japanese versions.

Simple 3D Stars for Christmas

We made ours  using old sample sheets of wallpaper leftover from when I decorated the chimney breast in our bedroom; I simply printed the template directly onto the A4 tester sheets (below) and then cut and folded the stars, which led to a beautifully tonal pile of petite étoiles which we’ve scattered along the mantel.  They’d look beautifulstrung into a garland, or even filled with small treats and used as place-markers on the holiday table; just leave one flap of the star unglued…

Making 3d stars

How to make simple 3D stars

3D stars to make

Have a wonderful rest of the day; we’re off to see Father Christmas later as darkness falls; rumour has it that his workshop can be found in a local forest if you take a compass and follow very specific directions, looking out for elves amongst the trees as you go.  Anticipation is very, very high….

handbag logo

Two cool ways to wrap a bottle…

Two fun wine bottle styling ideas

Like many, I am a huge fan of Pinterest (you can follow me here)  and regularly Pin inspirational pics and projects to try at home.  A few weeks ago I stumbled across a link to a wonderful site by Sylvain Allard, who teaches packaging design.  He’d asked his students to design a wine bottle sleeve from a single sheet of paper; the results were beautiful.  One sleeve in particular caught my eye, so I had a go at recreating it at home, wondering if it would prove to be easy enough to become a new, chic way of bringing-a-bottle to parties this coming holiday season.

Firstly, I drew out a rough template of rectangles, each slightly deeper than the next.  Using a craft knife I cut along three sides, rolling each strip back on itself as shown below….

bottle 12

I folded and glued each strip in an arc, slightly offset, sticking it at an angle as shown below…

bottle 11

I practised on a rough sheet of paper first, but when I then wrapped it round a wine bottle it looked a little plain, so I added a corkscrew image to my template as well, as you see above and below.  To attach the sleeve, I just used colourful washi tape to hold the ends together.  Voila!

bottle 4  bottle 2

Making the sleeve took me about half an hour, which included the time to deconstruct and reinterpret the picture I’d seen on Sylvain’s site.  You can make it even more quickly by using my template (below; PDF link at the bottom) – let me know how you get on!

Wine bottle sleeve template

Suddenly wrapping bottles seemed like a great way to spend the evening, so I found a few leftover vintage envelope prints I had from making our hot air ballon and used them to make this other sleeve below..

botttle 1

I had googled ‘vintage envelopes’ and found some lovely free-to-download examples including some here (worth a rummage in this treasure-trove of free printables)

bottle 13

I simply cut a rectangle of brown paper, scrunched it up and flattened it, glued on an envelope and secured it around the bottle with string.  This one was much quicker but looked just as lovely.

So, why not wait for a rainy evening ahead of the party season and have a play!

bottle sleeve paper sculpture

handbag logo

The Cartographer’s Guide to Dress-Making

Paper Dress made from maps

I live in a small village which is blessed with not one but three – three – second-hand bookshops.  Amongst the shelves of nearly-new thrillers and bodice-rippers, travel guides and cookbooks there is a large, open-fronted cupboard marked ‘Ephemera: Misc’.  It’s here I gravitate towards and where I’ve found a myriad of wild and wonderful books, maps, charts and music scores over the years which have steadily formed a small paper drift in my studio, waiting for inspiration to strike.

One of my recent buys was this Collins Graphic Atlas; I’ve no idea of the age but it was certainly pre-decimalisation, given the princely sum of 5 shillings…

Vintage map book

It had pages and pages of beautiful old maps and charts of the constellations in each hemisphere (I think I’ll frame these two as a set; I can’t bear to cut them up..)

Map book

 

Inspired by amazing paper dresses like these, I decided to have a go at making a piece of art for my friend’s newborn daughter to hang in her nursery.  Armed with scissors, a bone folder and  - of course – a nutritional glass of wine, I set about playing with ideas and choosing the loveliest and most interesting maps.

The hardest bit was working out how to create a pleated dress shape.  It took me several false starts to think it through (use rough paper till you get the hang of it), but eventually; ta-da!! the perfect concertina box pleat;

Dress making with vintage maps

To save you the brain strain I experienced, here’s a guide below for how to make a box fold.  Essentially, you need to measure out and mark up your map or paper with alternate widths of 2cm/1cm, and then score them lightly using a bone folder to make folding easier.  The grey dotted lines below indicate where you fold the paper inwards to make an inverted fold; the red lines show where you fold away from you to build up the raised pleat areas.  Once you have made your box pleats, flatten the top end and gently spread out the bottom edges to create a fan effect like in the picture above.  Give it a whirl..

How to make a box pleat

Once the dress shape is made, the rest is fun and just needs imagination and a bit of playing around.  I made lapels for the dress using the edges of a map, folding carefully to match the borders, and using a punch to cut out a large decorative button (this can also cover a multitude of sins when you’re sticking it all together)

Assembling a paper dress

As you see above, I made little puffed cap sleeves by cutting semi-circles and lightly gathering and glueing them – but then decided later not to use them.

I assembled the dress together and then glued each part in place onto a sheet of white watercolour paper, layering it up, piece by piece.  It needed one final touch, for a tiny but determined person with the world at her feet and a life full of adventure ahead…

Matilda and her dress

And here it is!

Matilda's Map Dress

Good luck if you decide to give this a whirl; although I used my book of maps, any gift wrap, patterned or even plain paper would look good.  And do let me know how you get on…

handbag logo

A Cupcake Armada (and back to school fever!)

Cupcake Armada

How are you?  Today feels like the last day of the long summer break, before school and work restart in earnest next week.  An amazing summer of long hot days, evenings without bedtime curfews and delicious expanses of family time.  A summer too of sporting achievements; armbands are now permanently consigned to the loft and Harry is confidently afloat and swimming like a fish (albeit a wriggling, giggling one, who is liable to take onboard water in moments of distraction…).

We’ve also had the time to make progress with more of the house redesign and decor, tackling the upstairs rooms a little at a time; so exciting.  And many more projects in the pipeline… but more on that in a minute.

First though, a fun papercraft-and-cake project from this week (combinations don’t come much better than that, surely); a practice-run of ideas for friends who want to have homemade vibrant and fun cupcakes at their seaside wedding instead of a traditional cake.

cupcake sails 07

I wanted to create the impression of masted sails and chose long wooden barbecue skewers and strips of brightly coloured paper to create the effect.  For the pattern – which reminded me of swirling sea colours but also picked out the pink theme colour of the wedding – I downloaded one of the wonderful free watercolour designs by Yao Cheng for DLF , cropped it into long rectangle shapes and then added some text in Powerpoint (below).  If you don’t need to add writing, I’d just chose a lovely patterned sheet of gift wrap and cut out rectangles of about 2×5 inches.

cupcake sails 02

I painted each skewer with food colouring; you can do this neat from the bottle or dilute for a more subtle colour.  I left the bottom of the skewers unpainted but of course the beauty of the food colouring is it’s completely non-toxic and safe to be thrust deep into sponge…

cupcake 04

I threaded the paper onto the skewer and then pushed a small pearl bead onto each skewer tip both for decorative effect and to avoid any partygoers accidentally poking themselves in the eye when leaning over to choose their cake.. and also strung a few tiny bells randomly on the mast tops..

cupcake sails 05

Ta-da; the finished cupcakes!  Easy to produce en masse but equally fun just to make for teatime.

cupcake sails 07

 In other news… Harry and I have been embarking on a rather more substantial project this month; remember the Parisian Play Shop?  It was well-loved and well-played with for about a year but gradually became a dumping ground for all kinds of toys, books and half-built Lego models.  Whilst the play kitchen is very much still in active use, and acts like a magnet for any little girls who happen to be passing through, the shop seemed to have run its course, so I moved it to the loft to create space and forgot about it.

But then, this summer we stumbled across a pop-up puppet show in the local park – and Harry was absolutely transfixed.  There’s something about the slapstick comedy and audience participation which completely captured his imagination and made him chuckle whenever he thought about it for days afterwards.  So… we’re building a puppet theatre together, where we can stage our own plays at home.  I began by bashing out the top shelf and getting a large hole cut out from the back..

puppet theatre in progress

and finished up…….

starlight puppet theatre DIY

…well, I think we’ll open the theatre officially with a Grand Reveal next week, when our finishing touches are complete. We have some rehearsing to do after all :-)

Have a great weekend when it comes; I’ll be making the most of the last couple of days of lie-ins and sunshine, in-between stitching in name tags and retrieving long-abandoned school kit from corners around the house..

handbag logo

Gifting ideas (and the week in which my tenuous grasp on horticulture is lost)

Wine Bottle Tags free download

Happy Monday!  I hope you had a lovely weekend, and one which hasn’t receded too dramatically into the mists of time.  Ours was packed with socialising with some of our closest friends, mostly al fresco thanks to the very un-British heatwave.  Long may it continue.  Friday night was supper with friends so I baked a batch of our tried-and-tested oatcakes to take along (delicious with cheese), and designed a bottle tag to drop around the neck of a bottle of wine.  An Eat Me, Drink Me combination worthy of Alice in Wonderland, but with somewhat more predictable results… and fewer rabbit holes.

Gifting ideas; wine bottle tags

Here’s my downloadable template if you want to make a batch of tags; for those with proper grown-up wine cellars or any kind of grape expertise, they’d be great for recording tasting notes or details of dates and vintage.  Or simply greetings and instructions to consume immediately, as we did…

Wine Bottle Tag Printables

Just cut around the outside, then punch or carefully cut out the hole and lightly fold along the dotted line before slipping over the neck of your bottle.

Wine Bottle Tag Printables

Our social whirlwind continued with a visit to Harry’s godparents and their new puppy, an adorable 5 month old labrador; we made her a jar of peanut-butter dog biscuits and I also experimented with a new iPhone/iPad app called Waterlogue which converts photos into watercolour-effect pictures.  All we had was this low-res picture of Lexie, but when imported into Waterlogue and transformed, it became a gorgeous, slightly abstract picture…

trialling waterlogue

I emailed myself the pic and cropped it slightly then printed it onto sheets of white linen cardstock to make a set of notecards for the family; I added text to some and left others bare.  I can see Waterlogue is going to be my new time waster for a little while…  if you have an iPhone it’s worth checking it out;  from my early experiments it works brilliantly with some photos and can’t seem to interpret or adapt others –  a bit hit and miss – but inexpensive enough to try.

Dog watercolour cards project

DIY cards using Waterlogue app

The heatwave has been perfect for racing through garden sprinklers and spending hours in the paddling pool, but alas fatal for some of our conservatory plants; a handful have quietly breathed their last despite my fervent attempts to water and ventilate whenever we’re home (I have felt more like an ER surgeon, racing from one to the next to check possibilities for resuscitation than the genteel green-fingered pottering I’d imagined..).  Still, the mouse-melons have not only survived but thrived, and are shooting out plucky lassoos as they climb at a rate of knots…

Mousemelons climbing

The courgettes too are soaking up the dense heat and we now have row upon row of shiny – if somewhat eclectically shaped – cukes ready for Harry to pack in his lunchbox.

cucumbers in a row

I occasionally manage an early-morning wander through the garden before work, cup of tea in hand; this rose (below) looked too beautiful to ignore and now sits on my bedside table smelling divine.

garden rose

…and in a local thrift shop I found the perfect book to photograph for the cover of my gardening journal; it’s so very true…

the amateur gardener

….as evidenced by this, my bizarrely shaped courgettes (zucchini), which taste good but look like they were caught in a moment of indecision during a growth spurt about whether to remain courgettes or aim higher and pretend to be marrows.

misshapen marrow

Still, it’s all a good (if steep) learning curve… and at least our peas are uncomplicatedly obliging.  In fact, we are slowly creating a pea mountain, as we search for endless ways of incorporating them into every dish.

have a great week!

Kate

 

peas please

A Paper Reservation

DIY Play Tipis from Kates Creative Space

The brief arrival of summertime (now departed, replaced by a week of torrential rain), turned our heads this week to camp-outs and camp-fires; to nights under the stars and balmy, warm evenings under a wide open sky.  These at least are Harry’s thoughts; as a camping novice, his romantic notions are untroubled by reality; midges, creepy-crawlies, rising damp and those strange, spooky rustling noises in the dead of night that seem somehow to be bear-sized are all yet to come.   We have agreed that this summer we will gather sleeping bags and canvas, torches and firewood and try it for real …in the back garden at least.

Until then, we’re making do with these fun paper tipis which I created in Powerpoint and which we’ve been constructing in different colours and sizes to make a small reservation for the various Lego men, animals and other homeless itinerants of Harry’s toy box.  They seem to appreciate the gesture, even if unused to sleeping under the same pitched roof;

DIY tipi with props

These are very simple to make once you’ve printed them out; you’ll need only a handful of wooden skewers, cocktail sticks and some glue or tape.  I’ve drawn one authentic-looking leathery tipi complete with markings, and one more plain ecru-design which can be coloured in, decorated or otherwise customised as you see fit (because there’s always room for sequins and glitter glue, even on the plains).

DIY tipi free downloadDIY Tipi free dowload

Tipi markings

To make the tipis, I used these wonderful free leather textures – definitely worth bookmarking if you’re a creative type. So, arm yourself with a pair of scissors and give them a whirl.  Even if you don’t have little people in your life these are fun to make and look very decorative on a bookshelf or mantle.  Or why not print them out and make a kit to send to someone for whom it might be JUST the project to occupy a rainy day?

Instructions below – email me if you get stuck.  Oh, and of course, be careful not to accidentally poke yourself in the eye with a skewer, especially if doing this with a glass of wine in the other hand.  For added safety, you could add a colourful bead to the tip of each one like here.

Still, I can assure you that making a paper tipi is far less hazardous than trying to erect the real thing, especially when your assistant is an easily distracted four year old.

Enjoy!

Kate

Decorated Authentic Style Tipi Template

Plain Tipi Pattern with Red Laced Entrance

cheetah in tipi

 

 

Tipi Instructions